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ABCRIT.ORG: JOHN POLLARD – PAINTINGS

Exceptional abstract paintings that need to be seen for real.

Exhibition opens Saturday 30th April 2022, until Sunday 29th May.

Visit by prior appointment.

Text your name and requested date and time to 07866 583629, for return.

abcrit.org

Block K

13 Bell Yard Mews

175 Bermondsey Street

London SE1 3UW

The entrance to Bell Yard Mews is opposite White Cube in Bermondsey Street.

Block K is at the rear of the mews: the gallery is on the 1st floor, no lift.

This is the seventh exhibition of abcrit.org

All paintings are in acrylic on canvas.

Works in the exhibition, clockwise from entry:

“Zaffa”, 2021, 80x80cm

“Hid Dud”, 2021, 80x80cm

“End of Times”, 2021, 80x80cm

“Brave World”, 2016, 150x120cm

“39 Times”, 2021, 80x80cm

“Tempered Grace”, 2021, 80x80cm

“Insignia of Lockdown (Gupta’s Tears)”, 2021, 150x120cm

“Daemon Times”, 2021, 80x80cm

“Phainesthai”, 2017, 150x120cm

“Fondamenta Dei Mori”, 2021, 160x120cm (diptych)

“Spinner”, 2021, 80x80cm

(on the right) “Cross-Speeding”, 2021, 40x40cm

All paintings are for sale.

150x120cm – £2,700

120x160cm – £2,850

80x80cm – £1700

40x40cm – £800

Comments can be made on abcrit.org both before and after visiting. Submissions are moderated.

ADDENDUM

After discussion on site between John Pollard and Robin Greenwood, it was decided to hang these works the other way round, left to right, and with a small space between them.

“Fondamenta Dei Mori Part 1”, 2021, 120x80cm

“Fondamenta Dei Mori Part 2”, 2021, 120x80cm

ABCRIT.ORG: STEVEN WALKER – PAINTINGS

An exceptional solo exhibition of paintings by Steven Walker, who is an important contributor to the development of new and authentic abstract art.

Exhibition opens Saturday 26th March 2022; closes Sunday 24th April.

Visit by prior appointment.

Text your name and requested date and time to 07866 583629, for return.

abcrit.org

Block K

13 Bell Yard Mews

175 Bermondsey Street

London SE1 3UW

The entrance to Bell Yard Mews is opposite White Cube in Bermondsey Street.

Block K is at the rear of the mews: the gallery is on the 1st floor, no lift.

This is the sixth exhibition of abcrit.org

Works in the show:

untitled, 2021, acrylic on panel, 108x144cm.

untitled, 2021, acrylic on panel, 108x144cm.

untitled, 2021, acrylic on panel, 108x144cm.

untitled, 2021, acrylic on canvas, 120x150cm.

untitled, 2020, acrylic on canvas, 150x120cm.

untitled, 2020, acrylic on canvas, 152x122cm.

untitled, 2020, acrylic on canvas, 152x122cm.

untitled, 2020, acrylic on canvas, 95x75cm.

untitled, 2021, acrylic on canvas, 100x120cm.

Comments can be made on abcrit.org both before and after visiting (see below). Submissions are moderated.

abcrit.org: Sarah Greenwood – Patchworks

An exhibition of patchworks from 1990 to 2022, by Sarah Greenwood.

Exhibition opens Saturday 5th February 2022; closes 6th March.

Visit by prior appointment.

Text your name and requested date and time to 07866 583629, for return.

abcrit.org

Block K

13 Bell Yard Mews

175 Bermondsey Street

London SE1 3UW

The entrance to Bell Yard Mews is opposite White Cube in Bermondsey Street.

Block K is at the rear of the mews: the gallery is on the 1st floor, no lift.

This is the fifth exhibition of abcrit.org

Individual works in the show, in order of hanging, clockwise from the entrance:

“Bow Ties”, undated, 95x65cm

One/four/nine patch, untitled, probably late 1990s, 181x181cm

Up and down/ left to right: “Dark and Light”, undated, 110x81cm

Nine patch block: “Whirling Birds”, c.2002, 173x172cm

Four patch block: “Light and Dark”, c.2002, 206x204cm

Four patch block, untitled, c.2000, 171x171cm

Nine patch/ sixteen patch block: “Chequerboard”, 2021-22, 158x186cm

”’

Nine patch block, untitled, 2000-2016, 214x210cm

Four/ five patch block: “Staggered Stars”, c.2010, 68x68cm (on diagonal)

Works on the floor:

Random blocks, untitled, 2017-19, 148x141cm

Nine patch block, 1996, 171x172cm

ABCRIT.ORG: “DIFFERENT” – works by Stephen Buckeridge, Robin Greenwood and Patrick Jones

Exhibition open until 5th December 2021.

Visit by prior appointment.

Text your name and requested date and time to 07866 583629, for return.

abcrit.org

Block K

13 Bell Yard Mews

175 Bermondsey Street

London SE1 3UW

The entrance to Bell Yard Mews is opposite White Cube in Bermondsey Street.

Block K is at the rear of the mews: the gallery is on the 1st floor, no lift.

Facemasks optional.

This is the fourth exhibition of abcrit.org

Views of the exhibition:

Views of the individual works:

Stephen Buckeridge

“Hold, My Honey, Your Sweetness”, 2021, 60x50cm

“Each Flower Began”, 2021, 61x51cm

“And In The Grass Of This Rain”, 2021, 51x41cm

“The Cloth Keeps Out The Look Of The World”, 2021, 51x41cm

“The Silence After The Felled Tree”, 2021, 51x41cm

“A Gesture, An Action, A Touching”, 2021, 40x30cm

“Each Pine At Dusk Lodges The Bird Of It’s Choice”, 2020-21, 40x30cm

Robin Greenwood

“Stay Up Late”, 2021, H.88cm

“Are You Within?”, 2021, H.97cm

“What You’ll Say”, 2021, H.96cm

“Be A Bride”, 2021, H.94cm

Patrick Jones

“Positivity”, 2020, 122x183cm

“The Wind That Stirs The Barley”, 2020-21, 99x122cm

“The Weight”, 2020-21, 185x122cm

“The Sublime”, 2015-18, 256x135cm

ABCRIT.ORG: FULL LIST OF WORKS FOR “IN FULL COLOUR”

Exhibition closes Sunday 5th September 2021

Visit by prior appointment.

Text your name and requested date and time to 07866 583629, for return.

Emyr Williams, “Times Request”, 2021, 127x76cm

Emyr Williams, “Times Refuge”, 2021, 127x76cm

Emyr Williams, “Dog Days”, 2021, 127x76cm

Pete Hoida, “Naked Women Swimming”, 2019, 108×139

Pete Hoida, “Fevered Lace”, 2020, 104×112

Terry Ryall, “Land of Plenty”, 2021, 79x60cm (plus frame)

Terry Ryall, “Arabian Nights”, 2021, 41x31cm (plus frame)

Terry Ryall, “Snakes and Ladders”, 2021, 44x31cm (plus frame)

Noela James Bewry, untitled (red), 2020-21, 90x90cm

Noela James Bewry, untitled, 2021, 129x100cm

Terry Ryall, “Xanadu”, 2021, 50x41cm

abcrit.org

Block K

13 Bell Yard Mews

175 Bermondsey Street

London SE1 3UW

The entrance to Bell Yard Mews is opposite White Cube in Bermondsey Street.

Block K is at the rear of the mews: the gallery is on the 1st floor, no lift.

Facemasks optional.

This is the third exhibition of abcrit.org

See previous post for views of the exhibition.

ABCRIT.ORG: “IN FULL COLOUR”

Noela James Bewry (2), Emyr Williams (1)

Works by:

Noela James Bewry

Pete Hoida

Terry Ryall

Emyr Williams

abcrit.org

Block K

13 Bell Yard Mews

175 Bermondsey Street

London SE1 3UW

Exhibition opens Wednesday 28th July 2021 onward.

Visit by prior appointment.

Text your name and requested date and time to 07866 583629, for return.

The entrance to Bell Yard Mews is opposite White Cube in Bermondsey Street.

Block K is at the rear of the mews: the gallery is on the 1st floor, no lift.

Facemasks preferred for a visit.

This is the third exhibition of abcrit.org

Pete Hoida (2), Terry Ryall (3)

Emyr Williams (2)

We recommend a visit, but if you are unable to attend the exhibition, photographs and information of all the work will be shown later, towards the end of August.

abcrit.org: full list of works for “Constructed Paintings (and a Sculpture)”

clockwise from the door:

Dean Piacentini, “All At Once”, 2021, 60x50cm

Dean Piacentini, “Buffer Shuffler”, 2021, 90x75cm

John Pollard, “Pseudo-Obstruction”, 2019, 80x120cm

John Pollard, ”What Is This?”, 2021, 50x60cm

John Pollard, “After Reactivity”, 2021, 50x60cm

EC. “The Task of Reuniting”, 2019-21, 51x41cm

EC, “Onda (Wave)”, 2019-21, 50x40cm

EC, “I woke up and God said unto me ‘why dost thou fret about builders and packing, my child? Rise and go forth and paint.’ So I did. Towards splitting.” 2019-21, 50x40cm

EC, “I woke up and God said unto me ‘why dost thou fret about builders and packing, my child? Rise and go forth and paint. Don’t be scared if it’s ugly. Didst I not make some nightmare insects?’ So I went and painted.” 2019-21, 41x51cm

John Bunker, “Kythera”, 2020, 49x100cm

John Bunker, “Rite”, 2021, 37x65cm

John Bunker, “Kardaki”, 2020, 66x86cm

Dean Piacentini, “Inharmonicity”, 2021, 101x101cm

EC, “Planner Man. The Often Ruthless and Measured Translation of Ideas (aka Mister Motives’ Mess).”, 2015-20, 35x25cm

John Bunker, “Wild American Prairie”, 86x50cm

Sculpture in the center of the room:

John Panting, untitled, 1973, H.56cm

Copies of “John Panting; Sculpture”, written by Sam Cornish, and published by Sansom & Co. and Poussin Gallery in 2012, are available for purchase at abcrit.org (£10) or by post (£25).

This book is a compendium of photographs of the work and career of John Panting.

Panting was born in New Zealand in 1940 and emigrated to Britain in 1963. In 1973 he became head of sculpture at Central School of Art. He died in a motorbike accident in 1974.

In 1975 the Serpentine Gallery showed work from his career. Very few of his works now survive.

More information about this exhibition and how to visit is in the previous post.

The last day to visit is 4th July 2021.

abcrit.org: Constructed Paintings (and a Sculpture)

abcrit.org

Block K

13 Bell Yard Mews

175 Bermondsey Street

London SE1 3UW

Exhibition opens Wednesday 2nd June onward.

Visit by prior appointment.

Text your name and requested date and time to 07866 583629, for return.

The entrance to Bell Yard Mews is opposite White Cube in Bermondsey Street.

Block K is at the rear of the mews: the gallery is on the 1st floor, no lift.

Facemasks continue to be required for a visit.

This is the second exhibition of abcrit.org

Artists:

John Bunker

EC

John Panting

Dean Piacentini

John Pollard

We recommend a visit, but if you are unable to attend the exhibition, photographs and information of all the work will be shown later, towards the end of June.

abcrit.org: painting, sculpture and textiles

Full list of works in the first show:

“Antivenom”, EC, 2019, 50x40cm

“Misai” (Misaje clan emblem of the river plant), Martha-Jean Uhamo (Doganne), Papua New Guinea, 2012, natural pigment on bark, 130x111cm

“Mad Salt”, Harry Hay, 2019, 49x34cm

“Yarn Through the Spars”, Harry Hay, 2019, 49x36cm

Kilim Carpet, probably middle eastern, early to mid-20th century, 384x197cm

Untitled quilt, American Mid-west, unknown artist, pieced octagonal pattern, c.1930. 208x168cm

“Songsmith/Slide”, Robin Greenwood, 2020, oil on canvas, 165x135cm

“Yclept”, Alexandra Harley, c.1996, wood, H.69cm

“Freeloader”, Harry Hay, 2019, acrylic on paper, 32x30cm

Untitled 1, Steven Walker, 2019, acrylic on canvas, 100x140cm

“Oranges and Lemons”, Anne Smart, 1986, oil on canvas, 61x92cm

“Canoeing to Kansas”, Sarah Greenwood, hand-sewn quilt, 1991-92, 205x201cm

Untitled, Robin Greenwood, 2018, steel, H.73cm

“Turnberry Rough”, Alan Gouk, 1987, oil on canvas, 46x66cm

…………………………..

abcrit.org

Block K

13 Bell Yard Mews

175 Bermondsey Street

London SE1 3UW

Exhibition opens Wednesday – Saturday 14 April – 22 May 2021

Visiting by prior appointment only, two persons per visit.

Phone or text 07866 583629

Or email robingreenwood2@gmail.com

The entrance to Bell Yard Mews is opposite White Cube.

Block K is at the rear of the mews: the gallery is on the 1st floor, no lift.

Facemasks continue to be required for a visit.

This is the first exhibition of abcrit.org

The American Quilt

Untitled quilt, American Mid-west, unknown artist, pieced octagonal pattern, c.1930. 208x168cm.

“This masterpiece is the best example of how craft morphs into ART”

A comment about the above work on Twitter 24.4.2021.

This work is included in the first exhibition at abcrit.org, now in its opening weeks, with more information on the preceding post.

It takes a while to appreciate the achievements of this American quilt, or properly take in its significant differences from other quilts. For sure, it looks straight away like a good work, organised and sensitive, but it takes a little time to engage with its singular achievements of structure. The complex method it fully involves itself with, of putting together hexagonal pieces of randomly pre-sewn, and variously-sized, and differently-patterned and coloured fabrics, into long, pointed shapes, which are then, in turn, sewn with three other hexagonals, point to point, around a tipped-up black square, the whole becoming one of many octagons, then… well, it can’t fail to engage us too. Are they put together this way, like this? What is made first; and what, if anything, is sewn over the top? Questions might arise about the methods, but the questions are soon outweighed by the spatial and physical tug and turn of real materials.

The end result of this convolution is unusual, rare, but it is not absolutely unique. There are other examples to be found in the right books (*), but not many.

The appeal of this work is largely to do with its unpredictability. It modifies its own activity as you examine it, and re-focus and look again. Try to fathom how the pre-made parts physically/visually react when sewn up to and against something completely different in pattern and colour, but the same in shape; with no correlation, but clearly connected; with no hint of a pre-appointed design, but a full grasp of how the fullness of the whole fits together… are you following this? What about the important changes of scale between the different elements, as they go backwards and forwards and you move across…? This complexity appears simple, yet works without ceasing (and if abstract painting and sculpture can’t go down this route, it is perhaps their loss).

The detail below shows instances in which four hexagonal shapes come together to a crucial point, each shape made of several fabrics put together at random (probably) in different-sized “strings” across the length of each hexagon, which are then joined together in an octagonal arrangement around the black squares-on-edge… maybe. These areas of pointed junctions are very idiosyncratic, very dazzling, all very fluent in how they operate differently with/from their neighbors.

Building things together in ways that elevate the unpredictability of new connections, and how they visually operate together/against each other when acting within these new coincidental relationships, compares favourably with a lot of abstract art-making. The way this quiltwork is put together creates its very own abstract spatial activity. It takes you away, as you look, from where you thought you were when you started. The content is right on the surface, fully in view, yet tantalisingly hidden from simple sight.

Written by Robin Greenwood

(with some argument from Sarah Greenwood. I like the opening quote; Sarah thinks it is superfluous – this craft is already art.)

April 2021

* One of the best books on American quilts is “Unconventional & Unexpected – American Quilts Below The Radar” by Roderick Kiracofe, where there are a couple of similarly-organised quilts, plus many other types in a variety of spatial inventiveness.